Les sorties des Scribtonautes

Une semaine à Lacanau de @"Gaya Tameron" : ICI
Les sorties des Scribtonautes


À la vie, à la mort de @"Gaya Tameron"
Dispo : ICI
Les sorties des Scribtonautes


L'apprenti Oiseau de @"Gaya Tameron" : ICI
Les sorties des Scribtonautes


10-65 de @L.Williams : ICI
Les sorties des Scribtonautes

La Fugitive : L'automne des magiciens T1. de @Hélène : ICI

[Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Aller en bas

[Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Cess le Ven 1 Juin - 19:31

Bon, certains "interdits" piquent les yeux mais il y a quelques bonnes idées.

Trouvé ici.


This column is excerpted from Guide to Literary Agents, from Writer’s Digest Books.

No one reads more prospective novel beginnings than literary agents.

They’re the ones on the front lines, sifting through inboxes and slush piles. And they can tell us which Chapter One approaches are overused and cliché, as well as which writing techniques just plain don’t work when you’re writing a book.

Below, find a smattering of feedback from experienced literary agents on what they hate to see in the first pages of a writer’s submission. Consider it a guide on how to start a novel. Avoid these problems and tighten your submission!


False beginnings

“I don’t like it when the main character dies at the end of Chapter One. Why did I just spend all this time with this character? I feel cheated.”
– Cricket Freeman, The August Agency

“I dislike opening scenes that you think are real, then the protagonist wakes up. It makes me feel cheated.”
– Laurie McLean, Foreword Literary
In science fiction

“A sci-fi novel that spends the first two pages describing the strange landscape.”
– Chip MacGregor, MacGregor Literary


Prologues

“I’m not a fan of prologues, preferring to find myself in the midst of a moving plot on page one rather than being kept outside of it, or eased into it.”
– Michelle Andelman, Regal Literary

“Most agents hate prologues. Just make the first chapter relevant and well written.”
– Andrea Brown, Andrea Brown Literary Agency

“Prologues are usually a lazy way to give back-story chunks to the reader and can be handled with more finesse throughout the story. Damn the prologue, full speed ahead!”
– Laurie McLean, Foreword Literary


Exposition and description

“Perhaps my biggest pet peeve with an opening chapter is when an author features too much exposition – when they go beyond what is necessary for simply ‘setting the scene.’ I want to feel as if I’m in the hands of a master storyteller, and starting a story with long, flowery, overly-descriptive sentences (kind of like this one) makes the writer seem amateurish and the story contrived. Of course, an equally jarring beginning can be nearly as off-putting, and I hesitate to read on if I’m feeling disoriented by the fifth page. I enjoy when writers can find a good balance between exposition and mystery. Too much accounting always ruins the mystery of a novel, and the unknown is what propels us to read further.”
– Peter Miller, PMA Literary and Film Management

“The [adjective] [adjective] sun rose in the [adjective] [adjective] sky, shedding its [adjective] light across the [adjective] [adjective] [adjective] land.”
– Chip MacGregor, MacGregor Literary

“I dislike endless ‘laundry list’ character descriptions. For example: ‘She had eyes the color of a summer sky and long blonde hair that fell in ringlets past her shoulders. Her petite nose was the perfect size for her heart-shaped face. Her azure dress — with the empire waist and long, tight sleeves — sported tiny pearl buttons down the bodice. Ivory lace peeked out of the hem in front, blah, blah.’ Who cares! Work it into the story.”
– Laurie McLean, Foreword Literary


Starting too slowly

“Characters that are moving around doing little things, but essentially nothing. Washing dishes & thinking, staring out the window & thinking, tying shoes, thinking.”
– Dan Lazar, Writers House

“I don’t really like ‘first day of school’ beginnings, ‘from the beginning of time,’ or ‘once upon a time.’ Specifically, I dislike a Chapter One in which nothing happens.”
– Jessica Regel, Foundry Literary + Media
In crime fiction

“Someone squinting into the sunlight with a hangover in a crime novel. Good grief — been done a million times.”
– Chip MacGregor, MacGregor Literary


In fantasy

“Cliché openings in fantasy can include an opening scene set in a battle (and my peeve is that I don’t know any of the characters yet so why should I care about this battle) or with a pastoral scene where the protagonist is gathering herbs (I didn’t realize how common this is).”
– Kristin Nelson, Nelson Literary


Voice

“I know this may sound obvious, but too much ‘telling’ vs. ‘showing’ in the first chapter is a definite warning sign for me. The first chapter should present a compelling scene, not a road map for the rest of the book. The goal is to make the reader curious about your characters, fill their heads with questions that must be answered, not fill them in on exactly where, when, who and how.”
– Emily Sylvan Kim, Prospect Agency

“I hate reading purple prose – describing something so beautifully that has nothing to do with the actual story.”
– Cherry Weiner, Cherry Weiner Literary

“A cheesy hook drives me nuts. They say ‘Open with a hook!’ to grab the reader. That’s true, but there’s a fine line between an intriguing hook and one that’s just silly. An example of a silly hook would be opening with a line of overtly sexual dialogue.”
– Daniel Lazar, Writers House

“I don’t like an opening line that’s ‘My name is…,’ introducing the narrator to the reader so blatantly. There are far better ways in Chapter One to establish an instant connection between narrator and reader.”
– Michelle Andelman, Regal Literary

“Sometimes a reasonably good writer will create an interesting character and describe him in a compelling way, but then he’ll turn out to be some unimportant bit player.”
– Ellen Pepus, Signature Literary Agency


In romance

“In romance, I can’t stand this scenario: A woman is awakened to find a strange man in her bedroom — and then automatically finds him attractive. I’m sorry, but if I awoke to a strange man in my bedroom, I’d be reaching for a weapon — not admiring the view.”
– Kristin Nelson, Nelson Literary Agency


In a Christian novel

“A rape scene in a Christian novel in the first chapter.”
– Chip MacGregor, MacGregor Literary


Characters and backstory

“I don’t like descriptions of the characters where writers make them too perfect. Heroines (and heroes) who are described physically as being virtually unflawed come across as unrelatable and boring. No ‘flowing, wind-swept golden locks’; no ‘eyes as blue as the sky’; no ‘willowy, perfect figures.’ ”
– Laura Bradford, Bradford Literary Agency

“Many writers express the character’s backstory before they get to the plot. Good writers will go back and cut that stuff out and get right to the plot. The character’s backstory stays with them — it’s in their DNA.”
– Adam Chromy, Movable Type Management

“I’m turned off when a writer feels the need to fill in all the backstory before starting the story; a story that opens on the protagonist’s mental reflection of their situation is a red flag.”
– Stephany Evans, FinePrint Literary Management

“One of the biggest problems is the ‘information dump’ in the first few pages, where the author is trying to tell us everything we supposedly need to know to understand the story. Getting to know characters in a story is like getting to know people in real life. You find out their personality and details of their life over time.”
– Rachelle Gardner, Books & Such Literary

_________________
Fiche personnelle de cess
avatar
Cess
Maître Scribtonaute
Maître Scribtonaute

Féminin Messages : 3600
Age : 32
Localisation : Berzé-la-Ville

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par AliArt le Ven 1 Juin - 20:08

Merci!
avatar
AliArt
Scribtonaute de l'extrême
Scribtonaute de l'extrême

Féminin Messages : 5315
Age : 36
Localisation : Québec

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Cess le Ven 1 Juin - 22:02

à vot' service !beret!

_________________
Fiche personnelle de cess
avatar
Cess
Maître Scribtonaute
Maître Scribtonaute

Féminin Messages : 3600
Age : 32
Localisation : Berzé-la-Ville

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Dewen le Sam 2 Juin - 12:23

Bon, je ne suis pas d'accord sur tout (peut-être parce que je cumule moi-même les clichés :D), mais c'est vrai que c'est intéressant d'avoir le point de vue de ces personnes (des "agents littéraires" ? ça existe :o: ?).

Après, je ne suis pas fan des "interdits", je trouve que ça a tendance à formater les romans, du coup, c'est un peu dommage. Mais cet article reste très éclairant et donne des pistes !

_________________
Je suis la connerie de votre intelligence. – @Miaous

"Il y a trois règles à respecter pour écrire un roman. Malheureusement, personne ne les connaît."
William Somerset Maugham
avatar
Dewen
Scribtonaute de l'extrême
Scribtonaute de l'extrême

Féminin Messages : 5971
Age : 18
Localisation : France

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Cess le Sam 2 Juin - 13:04

des "agents littéraires" ? ça existe :o:: ?
oui, aux USA

oui, je te rejoins !

_________________
Fiche personnelle de cess
avatar
Cess
Maître Scribtonaute
Maître Scribtonaute

Féminin Messages : 3600
Age : 32
Localisation : Berzé-la-Ville

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Maanilee le Sam 2 Juin - 13:12

Pas qu'aux USA Wink
beaucoup de grands auteurs ont recours à ce genre de personnes également en France.
C'est beaucoup moins répandu que la bas et surtout c'est un poil "tabou"
mais l'auteure Samantha Bailly par exemple a fait un article où elle explique qu'elle a recours à un Agent Littéraire désormais pour mieux négocier notamment auprès des ME.


Dernière édition par Maanilee le Sam 2 Juin - 13:20, édité 1 fois

_________________
Dealeuse d'AT. Thermomix de l'écriture. Leader du gang anti-anacoluthes. Fervente disciple de Clonette. ♥️
avatar
Maanilee
Scribtonaute de l'extrême
Scribtonaute de l'extrême

Féminin Messages : 6997
Age : 31
Localisation : St Etienne de Tulmont

http://mespetitesmaanies.wix.com/marinegautier

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Cess le Sam 2 Juin - 13:16

Je ne savais pas ! Mais à quoi peuvent-ils servir, quand on est déjà reconnu ?

_________________
Fiche personnelle de cess
avatar
Cess
Maître Scribtonaute
Maître Scribtonaute

Féminin Messages : 3600
Age : 32
Localisation : Berzé-la-Ville

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Maanilee le Sam 2 Juin - 13:17

A negocier tes contrats, s'occuper du côté administratif, gérer ton agenda de dédicaces, gérer tes réseaux sociaux etc etc etc

_________________
Dealeuse d'AT. Thermomix de l'écriture. Leader du gang anti-anacoluthes. Fervente disciple de Clonette. ♥️
avatar
Maanilee
Scribtonaute de l'extrême
Scribtonaute de l'extrême

Féminin Messages : 6997
Age : 31
Localisation : St Etienne de Tulmont

http://mespetitesmaanies.wix.com/marinegautier

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: [Fiche technique] Les pires façons de commencer un roman (en anglais)

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum